SMOKING, NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTIONS AND BEING COOL

Blog: Max Dawson
January 2, 2017
I think most folks who smoke cigarettes wish they didn’t. One thing I have never heard any long-term smoker say is “Wow, I am really glad I have smoked for so many years! It has really brought a lot of good to my life.” Nobody says that.
Whatever you may think about smoking cigarettes, I think you will probably agree with me that most folks who do it wish they didn’t. And, so, people try to quit. And there are lots of products on the market to help folks with that. Products like Nicorette Mints, Smoke Away, NicoDerm, and other NRTs (Nicotine Replacement Therapies) continue to be available to assist people in quitting.
According to one website (verywell.com), “the best quit aid on the planet is your own will and determination. If you aren’t motivated and committed to kicking the habit, no quit aid can help you.”
Since this is my first blog post of the New Year I thought I would write a word about New Year’s resolutions. I am sure that a lot of smokers will resolve again this year to break the habit. I wish you well if that is you.
It has been my experience that folks are willing to keep their resolutions as long as they are convenient. The moment they become inconvenient or challenging, most people drop them like a hot potato.
New Year’s resolutions may express our good intentions. But for most of us, that’s all they are–good intentions. Mark Twain said something like this: “New Year’s Day is the time to express your good intentions through your resolutions. Next week you can begin paving the road to hell with them as usual.”
You remember the old proverb: “The road to hell is paved with good intentions.” We can do better than that, can’t we? Folks need to make common sense resolutions and then keep them.

THE FINAL WORD

Thinking about smoking one more time, why do most folks ever begin such a habit?The answer is almost universal: “To look cool.”
One mother warned her 15 year old daughter about the dangers of tobacco, and how other teens might peer pressure her to smoke “to look cool.” Mom explained to her daughter that she herself began smoking as a teen to look cool.
Her daughter replied, “No problem mom. If anyone tries to pressure me to smoke, I will just tell my friends that my mom smokes. How cool can it be?”
Ouch! That really hurts!
Blessings to you in the New Year, my dear friends,
–Max